Thanks Quirk Books!

Today at work, I was pleased to find a large box of Quirk Books’ upcoming release, Pride & Prejudice & Zombies: Dawn of the Dreadfuls, waiting for me at my desk. The book doesn’t come out til the end of March. Awesome.

My lovely blog, Geekadelphia, is hosting a Zombieland movie night at The Trocadero here in Philadelphia next Monday, and Quirk was kind enough to donate these books as giveaways / prizes. I’m keeping a copy for myself to review on the blog, of course.

I’d be lying if I said it wasn’t a goal of mine to one day pitch a book to Quirk. I just need to think of that killer, uber-creative idea. I mean, I’m an English professor! This should be easy. Let’s see…

  • Oedipus The Bling: A Hip Hop Greek Opera
  • Spamlet: A Hamlet Adaptation in the Vein of Monty Python
  • Beo-wolf: The Untold Story of Beowulf vs. The Wolfman
  • Oliver’s Fist: Oliver Seeks Revenge on Those Who Wronged Him
  • The Waist Band: T.S. Eliot’s Guide to Losing Weight & Staying in Shape

Quirk, if you’re interested in these, I have about a dozen more. Let’s talk. I will totally accept hugs, high fives, and a value meal from Wendy’s as my advance.

The Best American Eric: Reading & Writing

I guess it’s about time for a monthly update on here. I know, I don’t write on my personal blog nearly enough, mostly due to writing for my job and for my baby, Geekadelphia. That and I’ve been burying my face into anthologies of essays and travel writing.

This semester at MC3 has been fantastic, and teaching at Peirce College has proven to be both incredibly fun and challenging. However, I always find that the textbooks truly lack modern, unique, compelling essays for my kids. As a result, I picked up a lot of the Best American Essays collections, via eBay and Alibris, to hunt down pieces that I know my students will enjoy. Works that will make them see the FUN in reading and writing essays. After-all, there is a reason people adore Sloane Crosley.

I’ve also picked up a wealth of Best American Travel Writing. This month, I sat down to pitch a book idea to a possible publisher, and he/she absolutely loved it. Come Spring-time, I start work on a travel memoir. It’s an exciting time for me, and I’m trying to read as much travel writing as I can. It’s not enough to be excited. I have to be prepared. I’m leaving the details out until I launch the site for the book.

Things are looking up!

Novel Fail: Accidental Pop Culture Icon Reference

writing_fail.jpg

So I’ve been working on my book for two years now. It’s done, but right now I’m editing it, adding pieces here and there, really trying to flesh out some of the more shallow points in the story. I’m also working on creating a better ending. I recently caved and let a few friends (thanks Glen & Helen!) read it, and I’ve been getting some positive feedback.

However, I just caught this.

Here’s the scene towards the end of the book. One of the main characters, the love interest, Hannah, is leaving to go back home to her beloved state. The lead character chases after her bus, yelling for her not to leave in a super cute and highly (but purposely) cliche moment. He screams.

“Don’t go back to Montana, Hannah!”

… FUCK!

Seriously, did I really go two years working on this story, and not realize this?

Alexis: “find–>replace

You sure said it Lexie.